Algorithms and echo chambers in the world of learning

There has been lots in the news this past year about social media bias and echo chambers, which started gaining prominence when algorithms started meddling in your news feed. The major web companies collect a huge amount of data about you and in doing so are building a detailed profile comprising demographic data, likes and purchases and other data that has been captured and purchased. As you ‘like’ posts and pages, so the algorithm delivers similar content back to you. Your friends like certain things, or ‘people like you’ like certain things, and the algorithm delivers more of that content to you too. You search for and purchase certain things, and you get delivered content related to that. Maybe you even give away valuable data via an innocuous-looking Facebook quiz,  which is then sold to highest bidder and fed into yet more algorithms to target you with stuff you might ‘like’.

The resulting and widely-discussed ‘echo chamber’ means people seeing content that mostly just panders to their existing world view, whatever that may be. With increasing numbers of people now consuming news through social media alone, this results in people being less challenged, less exposed to other opinions and events,  with their views becoming ever more polarised and entrenched.

Continue reading “Algorithms and echo chambers in the world of learning”