Moodling around in Edinburgh

It was great to be at the UK MoodleMoot in Edinburgh this week. It has become an annual highlight for me as a place to meet old and new friends alike, to share some of the things we’ve been working on and to learn from the vast experiences of the Moodle community around the UK and wider afield. The event ran over four days but myself and Andrew Downes went up for the two conference days, along with a whopping 400 delegates from 29 countries.

Epic sponsors the Moot for the first time

epic-stand-mootuk14

After presenting for the past two years, Epic was a sponsor of the Moot for the first time this year. As a Silver sponsor this meant we paid a fee which went towards the running of the event, in return for a stand in the exhibition area and exposure in the event publicity material and banners. MoodleMoot is an important fixture in the UK learning technologies calendar and we have gained so much in the past from the knowledge sharing and networking, so it was a great opportunity to give something back financially, rather than just limiting our involvement to one or two presentations, important as that is. Andrew and I tried to balance a mix of stand duties during breaks and lunch with attending as many sessions as possible, so if you chanced upon an empty stand at some point then apologies, but judging by the number of business cards taken away we are sure to be speaking to many of you soon!

Talking about mobile learning with Moodle

I submitted two presentations ahead of the event and both were accepted. The Moot Gods were kind to me and scheduled both sessions for the morning of Day 1, which meant I didn’t have to spend valuable Moot time worrying or preparing, or have to present with a thumping hangover on day two (which has been known).

My first presentation was Using mobiles to support active learning with Moodle. Active learning was one of the conference themes, and I focused on using native mobile device features like taking photos, audio and video and submitting or sharing these into Moodle using assignment, forum and database activities.

Epic_Slidepack1
Click the image to open the presentation on Slideshare.

Continue reading “Moodling around in Edinburgh”

Getting to know Google Glass

A colleague at Epic is part of the Glass Explorer programme, and this weekend I was pleased to be able to take a Google Glass home to learn and experiment with. We took the device up to the LT14 show last week and it was a bit of a draw on the stand and was great to introduce people to this new world of wearable technology.

GoogleGlass_MarkAMy first impressions were that this is absolutely not intuitive to set up! It’s not like getting a new iPhone that ‘just works’. This thing takes a bit of time to get to know and understand. That’s fine I guess, as most of our interactions with computers to date have been limited to using mouse or touchscreen as input devices, so you do need to learn the basic user interactions needed for this thing.

Unfortunately though, there is no on-screen tutorial when it’s fired up (bearing in mind that I’m not the first user of the device, but there is no obvious tutorial in the menu system that I could view either). So I had to go to the Google Glass Help site and watch a few videos on my tablet first. This is a bit of a drag to be honest, I really dislike the trend for 5-10 minute instructional videos, I just want to get going.

People who are used to voice input for their computers will probably feel quite at home with Glass, such as Sat Nav and Siri users. I’ve not got any voice input devices myself, although my Android phone has Google voice search, but that’s not really been of interest to me until now. So I had to get over that initial self consciousness of using voice input for the first time. Frankly, saying “OK, Glass” out loud in a social context makes you feel like a complete dick. Extroverts and show-offs may like that, but not me. I can’t really see my opinion changing the more I use it, maybe I’m just not a fan of voice input devices, especially in social situations where they put up significant barriers. A new name has even been coined for these folks: Glassholes.

Continue reading “Getting to know Google Glass”

Top ten learning platform trends from 2013

The end of the calendar year is a great opportunity to reflect and take stock of some of the key trends in the learning platforms market that have stood out for me and the team at Epic over the past 12 months. Do these reflect your own views of the market? What was big for you last year? Let me know in the comments, it would be great to share thoughts and notes on what was a fast moving year!

Customers aren’t afraid to switch suppliers

It’s all about the customer, stupid. Everyone knows that, right? Well, I’ve learned a big lesson this year about customer service through the mistakes of others. I’ve lost count of the number of times we’ve picked up new customers who said their last supplier a) didn’t care about them, b) had poor quality of service, c) over-promised and could not deliver or d) behaved like lawyers and charged just to pick up a pen. I even had a new customer reveal that they threw one of our competitors out of an LMS procurement on ethical grounds because they were having a go at us! While it’s kind of nice knowing a competitor is so preoccupied with Epic that they focus on us in their sales presentations instead of on themselves, what is genuinely worrying is what appears to be a trend of falling standards in the industry. Of course, we sometimes make mistakes too, but I do think that our relentless focus on our customers keeps us ahead of the competition.

The drive to good user experience

LMS vendors are continuing to improve usability following years of negative feedback from customers and analysts. Customers are increasingly taking the lead on this, insisting on good user experience in their solutions. This is easier with bespoke platforms which we design from the ground up; however when using an off-the-shelf LMS you are always a bit constrained by the product’s capabilities. But there’s no doubt that Open Source gives you extra flexibility here. Moodle HQ have formed a dedicated front-end team and we have seen a renewed focus on usability in M2.5 and 2.6 which is warmly welcomed. Some of my favourite moments this year have been getting involved in design workshops with students and stakeholders. This is basic stuff, but so often forgotten in technology projects.

Continue reading “Top ten learning platform trends from 2013”

Thoughts from #LT13UK

So, the dust has settled from Learning Technologies 2013. What a completely manic two days! I’m not sure how many years I’ve been doing this but it seems like a lot, and I never tire of it. I was looking forward to it for weeks and it didn’t fail to deliver. There were a number of highlights for me.

My presentation

I did a presentation in one of the exhibition theatres on Tuesday: “What does your next LMS look like?” It was the first time I have presented at LT despite many years of attendance and the theatre was absolutely rammed which was great.

LTseminarImage: My “What does your next LMS look like?” session on Tuesday morning

Continue reading “Thoughts from #LT13UK”

Reflections on 12 months at Epic

1 today!Wow. This week marks 12 months back at Epic for me and what a year it has been! A slew of awesome Moodle sites, high growth in our open source services, a fantastic new open source team, getting stuck in at MoodleMoot and iMoot conferences and loads more exciting stuff. It’s been a jam packed year for sure. it was always going to be a bit weird rejoining a company I had been part of for 11 years prior to my three years at a competitor. But that three years doing a high growth startup (launching Kineo’s open source business) was a massive education, albeit one that went off in a direction that wasn’t a comfortable fit for me. Continue reading “Reflections on 12 months at Epic”